Logan Olds Abruptly Leaves West Valley Water District After Three Month Stint

Less than four months after he was hired into the post of assistant general manager by the West Valley Water District, Logan Olds abruptly departed from that position late last month.
Olds left, according to an individual familiar with district operations, because of dismay at having to deal with an ongoing personnel issue involving one of the employees he oversaw, and not being able to bring to bear the solution he felt would best serve the situation. Olds was constrained in the action he wanted to take, the Sentinel was told, and was chaffing under what he characterized as micromanaging by West Valley General Manager Clarence Mansell, Jr.
Olds’ departure from West Valley was as unexpected as his arrival in May. Olds had been the general manager of the Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority since 2006. His departure from that post after 13 years had been sudden and unannounced. There had been no indication from the authority of any dissatisfaction with Olds’ performance. During his tenure with Victor Valley, the authority had expanded its main plant in Victorville and built smaller satellite facilities in Hesperia and Apple Valley. He had also overseen a major unanticipated repair job that was necessitated early this decade after a major rainstorm in 2010 caused flooding and the inundation of a major pipeline in the Mojave River near the main plant.
Ironically, as would later prove to be the case at West Valley, Olds did have some difficulty with personnel during his run as general manager at Victor Valley.
Olds was provided with a $210,000 salary upon coming to West Valley, along with a benefit package of $61,000, which brought his total annual compensation to more than $270,000. Despite an earlier indication that Olds had been fired, later reports were that he had left of his own volition.
West Valley General Manager Clarence Mansell, Jr. expressed his appreciation and gratitude to Olds for his service to the agency upon Olds’ announcement of his departure from his position. “Logan Olds is a dedicated professional in the water resources field,” stated Mansell. “The service and results he provided to the ratepayers of our district is invaluable. Our administration, the board of directors, and staff are greatly thankful for his accomplishments during his tenure.”
Board President Dr. Michael Taylor stated, “Logan assisted our district in moving projects forward to better serve our communities. We were able to make improvements including bringing wells back into the system. I wish him continued success.”
On August 27, Olds notified the district of his intention to retire from his current position, effective August 30, 2019. “Everyone at West Valley Water District wishes Logan Olds all the best in his future endeavors,”  Mansell said.
The West Valley Water District is a special district governed by a five-member board of directors providing retail water to approximately 83,000 customers. The district purveys domestic water to portions of Rialto, Colton, Fontana, Bloomington, and a section of the unincorporated area of San Bernardino County and some households within the City of Jurupa Valley in Riverside County.
The West Valley Water District grew out of the West San Bernardino County Water District, which was formed on February 28, 1952 from the merging of  three local mutual water companies, inheriting water rights dating back to 1897.

County’s Leading Fire Service Dispatch Collective Adds Chino Valley & Apple Valley

San Bernardino County Consolidated Fire Agencies, the joint powers authority known by the acronym CONFIRE, has already grown to become the largest emergency/fire/urgent medical service dispatch operation in San Bernardino County. Next week the collective will welcome two fire departments into the pool of the authority’s controlling, and permanent, constituent agencies.
Already the permanent provider of dispatch services for eleven county fire protection agencies at the beginning of 2019, CONFIRE in March took on a contract to provide dispatch and communication service to the Chino Valley Independent Fire Protection District and the Victorville Fire Department. This coming week, the Chino Valley and Apple Valley fire departments will move from being agencies associated with the collective by contract to ones chartered as full members.
CONFIRE was formed on May 15, 1990 as a joint powers authority comprised by the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District and the fire departments of the cities of Redlands, Rialto, Loma Linda and Colton to provide hardware, software, services and other items to establish, operate and maintain a joint centralized public safety communications system.
CONFIRE’s system was intended to match and exceed the communications, response and dispatch system employed by the City of Ontario.
In the 1980s, the City of Ontario leapt ahead of virtually all of the governmental agencies in the region, with what was then its state-of-the-art emergency dispatch system. Multiple agencies on the west side of San Bernardino County contracted with Ontario to provide dispatch service, which was run out of the basement of that city’s fire department headquarters.
Using a digitized system that carried out split-second plotting of the locations of a given agency’s vehicles and fixed stations and then calculated response times from those assets to the location of the spot from which requests for emergency response within that jurisdiction were coming, the system directed dispatchers with regard to the most efficient utilization of available fire, paramedic and ambulance units. CONFIRE replicated and improved on that capability.
CONFIRE was established under the aegis of the Joint Exercise of Powers Act of the Government Code of the State of California.
On July 9, 2013, the charter of CONFIRE was amended to allow the addition of the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District as a member agency.
In 2014, the Montclair and Upland Fire Departments contracted with CONFIRE for dispatch services.
Next Tuesday, a second amendment to the charter is to be considered by the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors to admit the Chino Valley Independent Fire District and the Apple Valley Fire Protection District as parties and members of the Consolidated Fire Agencies.
Acting County Fire Chief Don Trapp has recommended that the board of supervisors ratify the addition of the Chino Valley and Apple Valley districts to the joint authority.
At present, the Colton Fire Department, the Loma Linda Fire Department, the Rancho Cucamonga Fire District, the Redlands Fire Department, the Rialto Fire Department, and the San Bernardino County Fire Department are considered member agencies of CONFIRE.
In addition, the Apple Valley Fire Protection District, the Big Bear Fire Department, the Running Springs Fire District, the Montclair Fire Department, the San Manuel Fire Department, the Chino Valley Fire District, as of March 2019, and the Victorville Fire Department, as of  March 2019, contract for dispatch services with the CONFIRE.
​On April 2, 2019, the board of directors for CONFIRE adopted a resolution recommending that each current party to the joint powers authority take action to amend the joint powers authority to admit Chino Valley as a member agency on the condition that Chino Valley pay the required buy-in amount. Apple Valley had been contracting for dispatch services from CONFIRE since 2009. Its original 10-year contract expired on June 30, 2019. The contract was renewed for a five-year term, but Apple Valley simultaneously initiated the request for membership in CONFIRE. On May 29, 2019, the board of directors for CONFIRE adopted a resolution recommending that each current party to the joint powers authority take action to amend the joint powers authority to admit Apple Valley as a member agency on the condition that Apple Valley pay the required buy-in amount. The other member agencies have approved the addition of both Chino Valley and Apple Valley. The San Bernardino County Fire Department is the final member to approve the addition of both parties.
The CONFIRE Board of Directors consists of its chairman, Loma Linda Mayor Rhodes Rigsby; vice-chairman, Colton City Councilman Ernest Cisneros; and board members Rialto City Councilman Andy Carrizales, Redlands Councilman Eddie Tejada, Rancho Cucamonga Councilwoman Lynne Kennedy and Third District San Berndino County Supervisor Dawn Rowe.
CONFIRE coordinates operations out of more than 100 fire stations serving numerous communities covering the majority of the residents and businesses within the County of San Bernardino. In 2018, the CONFIRE communications center dispatched responses to over 213,000 incidents.

High Desert Quality Of Life On-Line Survey Extended To September 15

High Desert entrepreneur and Victor Valley College Board Member Joseph Brady in conjunction with Cal State San Bernardino’s Institute of Applied Research and Policy Analysis is seeking from residents, business owners and government officials in the Victor Valley and Barstow their perspectives on quality of life issues and challenges facing the desert region.
Brady, the president of The Bradco Companies in Victorville who has been a major player in the High Desert’s real estate industry for a generation, put the survey together and with the support of roughly a dozen others active in public issues is making it available through September 15. Between August 1 and August 31, some 10,300 respondents took the survey, which prompted Brady to extend the original August 31 deadline to September 15. His goal is to achieve 15,000 responses.
The survey angles for general and specific attitudes with regard to issues that impact Victorville, Hesperia, Apple Valley, Adelanto and Barstow, ranging from transportation, housing, employment, government service, education, crime, code enforcement and the social and economic challenges residents and businesses face.
Among the questions is one probing opinions as to the advisability of rebranding the High Desert as the “Mojave River Valley.”
The survey is framed in multiple forms, one for residents, another for business owners, one for government officials and one for non-residents.
It is intended for those 18 years of age or older.
The survey is available at https://highdesertsurvey.com/.

Logan Olds Leaves West Valley Water District

Less than four months after he was hired into the post of assistant general manager by the West Valley Water District, Logan Olds abruptly departed from that position late last month.
Olds left, according to an individual familiar with district operations, because of dismay at having to deal with an ongoing personnel issue involving one of the employees he oversaw, and not being able to bring to bear the solution he felt would best serve the situation. Olds was constrained in the action he wanted to take, the Sentinel was told, and was chaffing under what he characterized as micromanaging by West Valley General Manager Clarence Mansell, Jr.
Olds’ departure from West Valley was as unexpected as his arrival in May. Olds had been the general manager of the Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority since 2006. His departure from that post after 13 years had been sudden and unannounced. There had been no indication from the authority of any dissatisfaction with Olds’ performance. During his tenure with Victor Valley, the authority had expanded its main plant in Victorville and built smaller satellite facilities in Hesperia and Apple Valley. He had also overseen a major unanticipated repair job that was necessitated early this decade after a major rainstorm in 2010 caused flooding and the inundation of a major pipeline in the Mojave River near the main plant.
Ironically, as would later prove to be the case at West Valley, Olds did have some difficulty with personnel during his run as general manager at Victor Valley.
Olds was provided with a $210,000 salary upon coming to West Valley, along with a benefit package of $61,000, which brought his total annual compensation to more than $270,000. Despite an earlier indication that Olds had been fired, later reports were that he had left of his own volition.
West Valley General Manager Clarence Mansell, Jr. expressed his appreciation and gratitude to Olds for his service to the agency upon Olds’ announcement of his departure from his position. “Logan Olds is a dedicated professional in the water resources field,” stated Mansell. “The service and results he provided to the ratepayers of our district is invaluable. Our administration, the board of directors, and staff are greatly thankful for his accomplishments during his tenure.”
Board President Dr. Michael Taylor stated, “Logan assisted our district in moving projects forward to better serve our communities. We were able to make improvements including bringing wells back into the system. I wish him continued success.”
On August 27, Olds notified the District of his intention to retire from his current position, effective August 30, 2019. “Everyone at West Valley Water District wishes Logan Olds all the best in his future endeavors,”  Mansell said.
The West Valley Water District is a special district governed by a five-member board of directors providing retail water to approximately 83,000 customers. The district purveys domestic water to portions of Rialto, Colton, Fontana, Bloomington, and a section of the unincorporated area of San Bernardino County and some households within the City of Jurupa Valley in Riverside County.
The West Valley Water District grew out of the West San Bernardino County Water District, which was formed on February 28, 1952 from the merging of  three local mutual water companies. The newly formed entity inherited water rights dating back to 1897, along with other assets. Early on, the district supplied more water for agricultural purposes than for domestic use. During the 1970s and 1980s, the district grew and homes, businesses and schools soon surpassed agricultural water use. There were other mergers where smaller water companies became a part of the water district. By the end of the 1980s, the district water facilities included 180 miles of pipeline, 12 reservoirs and 15 water wells.
At present, some 51 percent of the district’s water supply is from its own groundwater wells, located in five local basins, including the Chino Basin, the Bunker Hill Basin, the Lytle Creek Basin, the North Riverside Basin and the Rialto-Colton Basin. Another 17 percent of additional groundwater is purchased from San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District through the Base Line Feeder Project. That water also comes from local wells in the Bunker Hill Basin. The district obtains 18 percent of its water as surface water from Lytle Creek in the San Bernardino Mountains. This water is treated through the district’s Oliver P. Roemer Water Filtration Facility. The district also purchases surface water from the State Water Project through the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. That water is also treated through the Oliver P. Roemer Water Filtration Facility.
“In addition to maintaining high standards for our existing water supplies, we are also looking at innovative ways to bring new sources forward to help boost our water supplies during the drought and to meet future water demands,” according to Naseem Farooqi, the district’s spokesman.

Chuck Bader

Former Assemblyman Charles “Chuck” Bader  died Wednesday, August 28, 2019. A Republican, he was forced by the GOP to prematurely end his once-promising career as a legislator to make way for another rising star in the Party of Lincoln and take on a Democratic candidate he could not beat in a quixotic attempt to leap to the California State Senate.
Born in Los Angeles on March 19, 1940, and raised in Pomona where he graduated from Pomona High School, Bader attended and graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles, earning a bachelor of science degree in business administration.
He married Rosanne Mystrom in 1963 and then enlisted in the United States Navy, reaching the rank of lieutenant before discharging.
In 1967, Bader set out to make his way in the world in the real estate business, including becoming heavily involved in property management. In 1973, he formed his own company, Condominium Management Services.
After a stint on the Pomona Planning Commission, Bader successfully ran for city council in 1971, acceding to the position of mayor pro tem, an honorific bestowed on him by his council colleagues, in 1974. In 1977 and again in 1979, he was elected Pomona mayor.
In 1982, he was elected to the California Assembly in the 65th District, representing eastern Pomona, San Bernardino Coujty’s West End, Ontario, a portion of the eastern San Gabriel Mountains and other unincorporated areas of San Bernardino County, Victorville, Adelanto and Hesperia.
In his first term he served on the Assembly’s Housing and Community Development, Economic Development, and New Technologies and Education committees. During his second term he remained on the Education Committee, acceding to the post of vice chairman; left the Economic Development Committee and joined the Ways and Means Committee; and joined the Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials Committee. In his third term, he joined the Revenue and Taxation Committee and ledt the Ways and Means Committee. In his fourth term, he left the Housing and Comminty Development Committee, joining the Finance and Insurance Committee, and remaining as a member of the Revenue and Taxation and Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials committees.
He held progressive positions with regard to toxic waste regulation and some educational issues. He toed the Republican Party line with regard to law enforcement and the criminal justice system, as well as resisting Democrats with regard to enlarging the provisions of workers compensation insurance, asserting that the requirements of the program as drafted and put in place by the Democrats imposed costs that would drive certain entrepreneurs out of business. He authored  AB 1046 during his first term. AB 1046 dealt with what Bader termed “overly broad” categories of coverage in the “no-fault” insurance program for workers injured on the job provided for in the Democratic-sponsored AB 684, passed in 1982 before his tenure on the Assembly. Bader took exception to the way in which AB 684 stipulated virtually open-ended liability on employers whose workers were injured as a result of companies having removed machine guards on power presses to increase production speed. Bader’s bill did not pass. Bader attempted again in the 1985-1986 session with AB 156 to remove the “power press” exception from the worker’s compensation law. AB156, amidst much controversy, died in the Finance and Insurance Committee without ever coming up for a vote.
In his first term, Bader’s AB 2426 called for altering the process for credentialing teachers, calling for the abolishment of the independent commission responsible for issuing teaching credentials, which he asserted was not using any defined standards in its action. His bill called for placing the credentialing authority under the purview of the state board of education. AB 2426 made it out of the Education Committee on an 8-2 vote, but the Ways and Means Committee did not bring it up for a vote.
Bader’s Assembly Constitutional Amendment 35, introduced as well while he was a freshman legislator, was ultimately unsuccessful. It would have declared all unfunded mandates from the state on local governments voluntary.  ACA 35 failed to clear the Assembly Revenue and Taxation Committee.
Bader’s AB 1931, authored in 1987, called for an initial $13 million to be applied to alleviate, by means of a hydraulic siphoning system, the spread of contamination from the Stringfellow toxic waste dump in north Riverside County. The bill failed to make it out of committee.
Bader was respected by both Democrats and Republicans for his expertise in the arena of school construction.
Though he was not particularly successful in achieving passage of much of the legislation he wrote or co-wrote, Bader was seen by a majority of his constituents as being properly motivated and committed, and having the right attitude with regard to many or most of the issues concerning them. His prospects for reelection in the 65th going forward in the 1990 election and in the whatever Republican-leaning  Assembly district he would have been redrawn into in 1992 following, and based upon, the 1990 Census, were good to excellent, virtually ensuring he could have remained in the legislature another decade. For more than a year before the 1990 election, higher-ups in the Republican Party at first asked, then with greater firmness requested and then dictated that Bader forsake the Assembly and instead vie for the California Senate so that then-34-year-old Jim Brulte could initiate his political career. Bader, ever the good Republican soldier, entered the 1990 contest in California 34th Senatorial District against Ruben Ayala, who in 1974 had been the first Hispanic since 1911 to be elected to the California Senate. Bader gamely campaigned, and with an infusion of Republican money, made a contest of it. But Ayala had the upper hand all along in the Democratic-leaning 34th, which had a sizable Latino voting base, virtually all of which was committed and loyal to Ayala. Ayala prevailed, 80,949 votes, or 51.79 percent to 75,352 or 48,21 percent. That would prove to be the closest anyone would get to beating Ayala in his 24 years as a state senator. Still the same, the loss knelled the end of Bader’s political career.
In addition to his wife, Rosanne, Bader is survived by sons Ron and daughter in law Christine of Folsom, and Stephen of Aliso Viejo; grandchildren Caitlin, Cade, Cameron, Blake and Carson; sister Nancy Rogers; and nephews and nieces Bill Rogers, Robin Roberts, Julie Losi, Robert Breaux, Jerry Breaux, Nicholas Mystrom, Richard Mystrom, Jennifer Scott, and grandnieces and grandnephews.
Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, September 14, at Pilgrim Congregational Church in Pomona with a reception following.

Goodding’s Black Willow

Goodding’s black willow, known by its scientific name Salix gooddingii as well as Goodding’s willow, is a common native tree that grows throughout the State of California and the southwestern United States and northern Mexico,  in moist or  wetland areas in many types of habitat from mountains to desert. It is a common riparian species. It grows in an upright form to a height of 15-40 feet and a maximum width of about 25 feet, but will reach a length of 100 feet when curved or bent. It has thick, furrowed, shreddy bark and many thin branches. The leaves are up to 5.5 inches long, generally lance-shaped, and finely serrated along the edges. The young leaves are coated in hairs. The inflorescence is a catkin of flowers up to 3,3 inches long.
It has a moderate growth rate and is moderately long-lived. It is deciduous, growing dormant in the winter, with active growth during the spring and summer. Flowers are green and bloom in the early spring. Leaves are medium green. It tends to grow in streamsides, at elevations from below sea level to 2,000 feet. It performs in a wide variety of locations, from the South Coast to the Central Valley and perennial streams in desert areas.
This tree’s natural settings include streamsides, marshes, seepage places, washes and meadows. It is known to survive under conditions offering annual precipitation from 2.4 inches to 62.3 inches, and summer precipitation from 0.15 inches to 2.68 inches.
It has demonstrated the ability to survive a winter in which the coldest average monthly temperature reached 17.5 degrees Fahrenheit.
It tolerates some alkalinity and salinity as well as generally poor water quality, as long as adequate moisture is present. Due to its size and water requirements, this is not a common garden tree but is useful in restoration projects, bioswales, and other constructed wetlands. Like other willows it is an important wildlife plant.
Plants in the genus Salix are host to a wide variety of pollinators including several butterflies, including  the dreamy duskywing, the viceroy, Lorquin’s admiral, Wiedemeyer’s admiral, the mourning cloak, the western tiger swallowtail, the sylvan hairstreak, various moths, and some gall-forming wasps. Some birds, such as the Least bell’s vireo and the southwetern willow flycatcher, prefer to nest in large, dense willow thickets.
From calscape.org and Wikipedia

Grace Bernal’s California Style: It’s Only Just Begun

The colors, contrasts and contours  that will change fall are beige green on the lighter side, with floral prints, asymmetrical tops and dresses. Asymmetry  has been taking over and setting the trend. The fun has only just begun because we’re still in heat mode. But the mix and matching of fall is definitely coming together. The heat will end soon and we will be putting all sorts of pieces together in one chromatic outpouring. Summer is coming down, but fall is yet to unfold. I can’t wait to see more trends come out in the California towns.

·         “You can have anything you want in life if you dress for it.” — Edith Head.